The MSOP...

The MSOP...
FEAR BASED STRESS BOX Click on pic of MSOP!

Tuesday, February 5, 2013

A Damning True Statement!

"Public safety is MSOP’s top priority":

Q. What is the total operating cost of MSOP?
A. The total budget for fiscal year 2012 is $70.4 million.
Q. What is the per diem cost of the program?
A. For 2012, the per diem is $293.
Q. How old are the clients in MSOP?
A: MSOP clients range in age from 21 to 90 years of age. The average age is 46.

Minnesota Sex Offender Program frequently asked questions

Q. What is the Minnesota Sex Offender Program?
A. The Minnesota Sex Offender Program (MSOP) provides services to individuals who have been court-ordered to receive sex offender treatment. MSOP clients have completed their prison sentences and are civilly committed by the courts and placed in sex offender treatment for an indeterminate period of time.
Q. Where is the Minnesota Sex Offender Program located?
A. The Minnesota Sex Offender Program (MSOP) is part of the Minnesota Department of Human Services. MSOP is one program with treatment facilities in two locations — Moose Lake and St. Peter, MN.
Q. How many people are in the Minnesota Sex Offender Program?
A. As of Oct. 1, 2012, there are 669 clients in the Minnesota Sex Offender Program.
Q. How long has Minnesota had a treatment program for people who have been civilly committed as sex offenders?
A. Minnesota has had a civil commitment law since the 1930s that was primarily used for those determined to be Mentally Ill and Dangerous (MI & D), but it was not until the 1990s that these laws were revised and more widely implemented for sex offenders. MSOP opened in Moose Lake in 1995 to provide treatment to individuals who were committed as sexually dangerous persons or sexual psychopathic personalities. Prior to that, individuals who had a history of sexually offending behavior were committed to the Minnesota Security Hospital in St. Peter under the Psychopathic Personality Law.
Q. How is someone placed into the Minnesota Sex Offender Program?
A. Most MSOP clients, but not all, come from the Department of Corrections. Toward the end their sentences, all individuals convicted of sex offenses are reviewed for their potential risk for recidivism. The Department of Corrections determines which cases are referred for consideration of commitment. It is then up to the respective counties to determine if they want to pursue civil commitment for these individuals after their period of incarceration is complete.
Q. How does someone get discharged from the Minnesota Sex Offender Program?
A. Just as MSOP does not have the authority to place individuals into the program, MSOP does not have the authority to discharge individuals from the program. Clients must petition and receive approval from the Supreme Court Appeal Panel (SCAP) to transition to the MSOP Community Preparation Services (CPS), or receive a provisional discharge or discharge from commitment. In evaluating whether to approve a transfer to CPS, the SCAP must consider the following factors: The person's clinical progress and present treatment needs; the need for security to accomplish continuing treatment; the need for continued institutionalization; and, whether the transfer can be accomplished with a reasonable degree of public safety.
Q. How does MSOP help clients get ready to transition to move into CPS or into the community?
A. Public safety is MSOP’s top priority, and most of the clients in MSOP have been living in institutions for many years. To help prepare clients ready to make a transition into CPS or into the community, MSOP has implemented a rigorous reintegration process. Reintegration programming includes gradual, measured increases in privileges. This allows clients to apply what they have learned in treatment, manage their risk factors and demonstrate their ability to interact with others safely and responsibly, both on the MSOP campus and in the community.
Q. Has anyone ever been released from the program?
A. Recently, a client was provisionally discharged from MSOP and is currently living in the community under close monitoring and supervision. Prior to that, one other client was provisionally discharged a number of years ago. However, that client’s provisional discharge was later revoked for non-compliance with the requirements of the provisional discharge plan (this client did not reoffend). Currently, there are 10 MSOP clients who have successfully petitioned the SCAP to transition to CPS. To date, the SCAP has not approved any client's petition for full discharge from their commitment as a sexually dangerous person or sexual psychopathic personality.
Q. What if a victim wants to be notified about someone being provisionally discharged from MSOP?
A. Per statute, victims who want to receive notification of a client’s change in status, which includes provisional discharge, must submit a written request to MSOP.
Q. What is the total operating cost of MSOP?
A. The total budget for fiscal year 2012 is $70.4 million.
Q. What is the per diem cost of the program?
A. For 2012, the per diem is $293.
Q. How old are the clients in MSOP?
A: MSOP clients range in age from 21 to 90 years of age. The average age is 46.

Rate/Report this page Report/Rate this page


Quick Links

No comments:

Post a Comment